Tue, 31 Jan 2023

Russia, Pakistan Discuss 'Practical Engagement With Afghan Taliban

Voice of America
26 Jan 2023, 08:36 GMT+10

islamabad - Russia and Pakistan emphasized in bilateral talks Wednesday the need for "practical engagement" with Afghanistan's Taliban but ruled out formal recognition of the Islamist rulers until they address international concerns over women's rights and inclusive governance.

The Russian presidential envoy for Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov, led his delegation in the talks with Pakistani officials in Islamabad and briefed them on his meetings earlier this month with the Taliban in Kabul.

FILE - Russian presidential envoy to Afghanistan Zamir Kabulov speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Moscow, Feb. 13, 2019. FILE - Russian presidential envoy to Afghanistan Zamir Kabulov speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Moscow, Feb. 13, 2019.

Kabulov said Moscow was continuing to engage with the Taliban but was not considering granting legitimacy to the de facto Afghan rulers "for the time being," official Pakistani sources privy to Wednesday's meetings told VOA.

The sources quoted the Russian envoy as saying he "advised" the Islamist Taliban to move toward creating a politically inclusive government and easing curbs on women, saying that otherwise there can be no movement forward on the issue of their legitimacy, nor can Afghanistan get any substantial support from the world.

A brief Pakistani statement posted on Twitter after Kabulov's meeting with Deputy Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar said the two sides "emphasized [the] need for practical engagement with the interim Afghan government."

The Pakistani side also reiterated that Islamabad was not considering giving the Taliban formal recognition and would do so only collectively with the international community, the sources said.

The foreign ministry in a formal statement issued later offered few details of the meeting and did not mention the issue of recognition of the de facto Afghan authorities.

FILE - Hina Rabbani Khar, then Pakistan's minister for foreign affairs, speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, Jan. 16, 2013. Now her nation's deputy foreign minister, she said Jan. 25, 2023, that Pakistan and Russia are stressing the need for 'practical engagement' with Afghanistan's Taliban rulers. FILE - Hina Rabbani Khar, then Pakistan's minister for foreign affairs, speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, Jan. 16, 2013. Now her nation's deputy foreign minister, she said Jan. 25, 2023, that Pakistan and Russia are stressing the need for 'practical engagement' with Afghanistan's Taliban rulers.

The statement quoted Khar as urging the international community 'to continue extending assistance and support, in order to address urgent humanitarian needs and to provide a sustainable pathway for Afghanistan's prosperity and development."

The Taliban reclaimed power in Afghanistan in August 2021 following the end of almost 20 years of U.S.-led foreign military intervention in the conflict-torn South Asian nation.

The world has not yet formally recognized the male-only Taliban government, mainly over human rights concerns and curbs it has placed on women's access to work and education.

While the United States and Western nations at large shifted their Afghan diplomatic missions to Qatar after the Taliban captured Kabul, several countries, including Pakistan, Russia, China, Turkey and Iran, have kept their embassies open and maintain close contacts with the hard-line rulers.

Chinese support

Last week, newly appointed Chinese Foreign Minister Qin Gang spoke with his Taliban counterpart, Amir Khan Muttaqi, and reaffirmed Beijing's support for the group to establish what he called "a broad and inclusive political structure" in Kabul.

Afghan women have been excluded from most areas of the workforce and have been banned from using parks, gyms and public bath houses. The Taliban have refused to reopen secondary schools for girls beyond grade six since returning to power.

The hard-line Taliban reject criticism of their administration, saying the government represents all ethnic and political groups in Afghanistan. They also strongly defend restrictions on women, saying the policies are in line with Afghan culture and Islamic law, or Shariah.

Last month, the Taliban authorities closed universities to female students until further notice, and they forbade women from working for national and international nongovernmental organizations.

The Taliban's curbs on Afghan female aid workers have forced major international charity groups to halt some of their programs in a country where 97% of the estimated population of 40 million lives below the poverty line and nearly half of them need humanitarian assistance.

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